Curriculum – Design Technology

Curriculum – Design Technology

Design Technology

The Curriculum

Curriculum Intent

Without design, we have nothing; every product that we use, room that we walk into and image that we see is the fruit of an impassioned creative re-envisioning how our lives could be improved or enriched by good design.  The Design Technology Department at Southend High School is renowned for its creativity coupled with an academic rigour that allows students to access higher concepts of conscientious design, materials science and innovation. The students that pass through our doors will develop a confident enthusiasm for working with different materials, equipment, and software to prepare for a future working in an increasingly technological world. To study design here is also to study people and their specific contexts, considering why we make the decisions we do about brands, products, and services. Our students are encouraged to evaluate markets and patterns in behaviours, broadening their societal views and encouraging them to think, appraise, and to question: all the knowledge in the world means nothing if we cannot use it to solve problems. At Southend High School for Girls, we synthesise knowledge from mathematics, science, the environment, sociology, business, marketing, history, and art to create solutions, producing intellectually curious students with a considered worldview.

What does it feel like to be a student in the Design Technology Department?

Design Technology is more than a subject at Southend High School for Girls; it is an ethos, forging interdisciplinary links between your other subjects.  From the very first lesson in Year 7 you will be challenged to consider the impact of your design choices with a real focus on shaping you as a conscientious consumer who is informed and able to make sustainable life choices.  As you grow through the school, you will learn about marketing strategy, enabling you to analyse and discern; essential skills for young people to navigate the media messages to which they are exposed.  You will then study innovation, looking at the products that shaped us and the individuals and strategies that created them.  All of this learning is underpinned with substantial practical experience, and you will leave KS3 with skills and confidence in working with timber, metal, polymers, papers, textiles and electrical components.

Opportunities at KS4 and 5 are broad; you will be able to undertake a qualification in any of the different technology disciplines.  There is no single skill that will define you as a student of Design Technology.  You need to both reflect and evolve.  You need rigour and structured thinking, but also the ability to ‘jump the curve.’  Your practical ability will be nurtured and challenged; so too will your ability to practically apply mathematics and materials science to the problems you are trying to solve through your studies.  You will need to analyse and opine; criticism is a vital function of design process and you will learn the value of independent thinking and expression, leaving you thoroughly prepared to enter higher education and the workplace.

Journey

Design Technology Curriculum

At Southend High School for Girls we teach a curriculum that is designed to offer real-world insight and skill. The SHSG Design Technology curriculum is devised to allow students to engage with a balanced variety of knowledge, practical skill and wholistic insight in order to produce rounded and confident young technologists.

The Design Technology curriculum is planned and delivered using the intellectual framework of the classical education model, the Trivium:

  • Grammar (Knowledge and skills) awareness of topical issues in design, knowledge of materials and processes, practical skill in a variety of materials
  • Dialectic (Enquiry and exploration) research, develop, analyse, evaluate, challenge
  • Rhetoric (Communication) designing, discussion, presentation, critique

Year 7 – 9

Pre-requisite or helpful knowledge from Year 6 Design Technology ready to study in Year 7 if applicable
The KS2 National Curriculum for Design Technology is very broad and would lead perfectly into KS3.  Experience tells us that students are extremely unlikely to have been offered the full breadth of these studies at junior school and that a highly differentiated approach across ys7-9 is essential for all students to progress from highly varied KS2 experiences

Adjustments from the Pandemic for years 7 – 9 if applicable?
Students DT experiences have led to an even greater dichotomy of prior learning.  Some students will have undertaken even less/potentially no exploration of the subject.  Others, through independent project work, may have had a greater than usual opportunity to engage with the subject.

The topics below have been chosen in order to meet the breadth of skills in the KS3 National Curriculum, featuring experiences of working within the different subject areas of Graphic Design, Textiles Technology, Resistant Materials, Product Design and Systems and Control.  Aspects of the design process have been allocated within year groups in order to provide an increasing level of challenge throughout KS3.

Year 7

Half Term 1

Area of Focus

  • Sustainability

Assessment

  • Life cycle analysis
  • Materials notes

Half Term 2-3

Area of Focus

  • Design Process

Assessment

  • Research: Product analysis
  • Design: Final Design

Half Term 4-6

Area of Focus

  • Manufacturing skills

Assessment

  • Practical: wood
  • Practical: Textile
  • Practical: Graphic
  • Evaluation: product

Year 8

Half Term 1

Area of Focus

  • Marketing

Assessment

  • The 4Ps
  • Branding task

Half Term 2-3

Area of Focus

  • Design Process

Assessment

  • Research: Results analysis
  • Design: Iterative design

Half Term 4-6

Area of Focus

  • Manufacturing skills

Assessment

  • Practical: metal
  • Practical: Textile
  • Practical: polymer
  • Evaluation: user trial

Year 9

Half Term 1

Area of Focus

  • Innovation

Assessment

  • Ergonomics
  • Biomimicry presentation

Half Term 2-3

Area of Focus

  • Design Process

Assessment

  • Specification
  • Design: working drawing

Half Term 4-6

Area of Focus

  • Manufacturing skills

Assessment

  • Practical: wood
  • Practical: Textile
  • Practical: Systems
  • Evaluation: against specification

Achieving mastery in Design Technology – knowing and remembering even more than what is expected in a grammar school Year 7 curriculum

Our assessment practice at SHSG reflects on how successful students have been in knowing, remembering and doing more through the above topics. They are either emerging, developing or proficient in this journey throughout Year 7.

In order to achieve mastery in Design Technology it would be expected that students would demonstrate a sophisticated awareness of contemporary issues within the broader area of focus we are studying (e.g. sustainability) and would be confident and articulate in discussing/debating these issues.  Students should seek out opportunities to engage in challenging practical skills and would be designing or making prototypes that featured creativity or innovation beyond those techniques studied in class

Recommended reading in Design Technology for Lower School (Years 7 – 9)

  • See departmental reading notice board in CPA block

Useful websites, TED Talks and research for Lower School (Years 7 – 9)

  • Abstract: the Art of Design – documentary series on available on Netflix and free on youtube
  • TED Talks – recommended and referenced throughout course. Embedded into PPTs placed on Teams to support lessons
  • The Design Museum (London)
  • The V&A Museum (London)
  • The Beecroft Gallery (Southend)

Music-specific language to master in Lower School (Years 7 – 9)

  • Students are supplied with a specialist glossary at the back of all handbooks
  • Students will use specialist terminology in each area of the curriculum as relevant

At Southend High School for Girls we are striving to create the next generation of engineers, designers, architects, materials scientists, marketeers and business people, amongst other DT related vocations.  As such, we aim to teach a broad and challenging curriculum, full of opportunity for students to discover their passion within the wider subject.

The Design Technology curriculum is planned and delivered using the intellectual framework of the classical education model, the Trivium:

  • Grammar (Knowledge and skills) knowledge, subject terminology, cultural capital
  • Dialectic (Enquiry and exploration) research, develop, test, trial, model, evaluate
  • Rhetoric (Communication) presentations, maps, hand-outs, debate, discussion

Pre-requisite or helpful knowledge from Key Stage 3 Design Technology ready to study at GCSE

  • Students should have a preferred material/equipment base to facilitate their specialism
  • Students should be enquiring and enthusiastic about design
  • Students should be unafraid of trial and error and should have an enthusiasm for problem solving

Adjustments from the Pandemic for GCSE if applicable?

  • Students have not had as much practical experience across any of the Design Technology disciplines at KS3 as they would normally have enjoyed.  Additional time will be focussed on up-skilling throughout y10 in order to prepare for NEA in y11.

The topics below have been chosen as they reflect the ambitions of the National Curriculum, and as a Grammar school, also challenge students beyond the National Curriculum. They have been carefully sequenced in this order to build a student’s learning journey to achieve the aims of our Design Technology intent. Along the way students are assessed and topics will be revisited in assessments to keep each stage of this learning journey alive.

Year 10, Term 1

Topic 1 – Graphics:

  • Branding
  • DT & our world

Topic 1 – Textiles:

  • Fibres to Fabrics

Assessment

  • Handout
  • End of Topic test
  • Notation

Topic 2 – Graphics:

  • Manufacturing and processes

Topic 2 – Textiles:

  • Decorative Embellishment

Assessment

  • Notation
  • End of Topic test
  • Practical work

Topic 3 – Graphics:

  • Electronics and mechanics

Topic 3 – Textiles:

  • Sustainability

Assessment

  • LCA
  • End of Topic test

Year 10, Term 2

Topic 4 – Graphics:

  • Specialist knowledge in paper, timber, and polymers

Topic 4 – Textiles:

  • Technical Materials

Assessment

  • Notation
  • End of Topic test

Topic 5 – Graphics:

  • Specialist knowledge in paper, timber, and polymers

Topic 5 – Textiles:

  • Mechanics

Assessment

  • Notation
  • End of Topic test

Topic 6 – Graphics:

  • Developments in new materials

Topic 6 – Textiles:

  • Systems & Control

Assessment

  • Notation
  • End of Topic test
  • Practical work

Year 10, Term 3

Topic 7 – Graphics:

  • Preparing for the NEA

Topic 7 – Textiles:

  • Fashion

Assessment

  • Designer timeline
  • Notation
  • End of Topic test

NEA project – all Design Technology students

  • Context exploration
  • Brief selection
  • Product analysis
  • Market research
  • Independent research

Year 11, Term 1

NEA project – all Design Technology students

  • Specification
  • Designing
  • Development
  • Planning
  • Final design and Working Drawing

Year 11, Term 2

NEA project – all Design Technology students

  • Practical task
  • Evaluation

Revision – all Design Technology students

  • Practice papers
  • Review of topics

Year 11, Term 3 (one half term only)

Revision – all Design Technology students

  • Practice papers
  • Review of topics

Achieving outstanding outcomes in Design Technology – knowing and remembering even more than what is expected in a grammar school GCSE curriculum

Our assessment practice at SHSG reflects on how successful students have been in knowing, remembering and doing more through the above topics.

To go beyond what is expected of a Design Technology student at GCSE and achieve outstanding outcomes the subject, students should engage with their surrounds, ever conscientious, ever critical of the products they are using.  Visiting exhibitions is a fantastic way to broaden cultural capital in design and experience alternative styles and aesthetics to their own, preferred brands.   Students should study their other subjects ever mindful of the web that Design Technology spins between these; particularly the sciences, maths and humanities.

Recommended reading in Design Technology for GCSE

  • Any books from the KS4 Reading List that are available in the department

Useful websites, TED Talks and research for GCSE

  • A list of videos and helpful websites are provided on Teams once you start the course. An up to date list of recommend library books can be found outside the Design Studio.

Design Technology-specific language to master at GCSE

  • Students will be encouraged to use correct nomenclature for materials and equipment through lessons, written and NEA tasks
  • Students will be encouraged to broaden their descriptive vocabulary in order to access necessarily impressive analyses, developments and evaluations

At Southend High School for Girls we teach a curriculum that is ambitious and takes students on a learning journey beyond the A Level Syllabus. The SHSG Design Technology curriculum for A Level invites students to challenge the limits of their skill and creativity and allows them the opportunity to forge a highly personalised design experience.  Students will complete their A Level by specialising in either Product Design or Fashion & Textiles.

The Design Technology curriculum is planned and delivered using the intellectual framework of the classical education model, the Trivium:

  • Grammar (Knowledge and skills) materials, equipment, technique
  • Dialectic (Enquiry and exploration) analyse, explore, research, develop, evaluate
  • Rhetoric (Communication) written, oral and visual communication

Pre-requisite or helpful knowledge from GCSE Design Technology ready to study at A level

  • Students should have a GCSE in either Design Technology, Art, Media Studies or Computer Science in order to help prepare them for the rigours of portfolio work.
  • Students should have confidence and skill in working with at least one of the five materials bases (textiles, timbers, card, metals, polymers) and associated equipment
  • Students should have an enthusiasm for portfolio work and be motivated and resilient in order to transition to the more specialised A Level portfolios.

Adjustments from the Pandemic for A level if applicable?

  • There is an entire cohort of students who have not had full ‘coursework’ requirements (those starting September 2021 and September 2022) and therefore the breadth and depth of the A Level NEA will be more of a ‘step-up’ that would normally be expected.

The topics below have been chosen as they reflect the ambitions of the National Curriculum, and as a Grammar school, also challenge students beyond the National Curriculum. They have been carefully sequenced in this order to build a student’s learning journey to achieve the aims of our Design Technology intent. Along the way students are assessed and topics will be revisited in assessments to keep each stage of this learning journey alive.

Year 12, Term 1

NEA progression

  • Skills carousel: 2D Design, Illustrator, laser cutter, pewter casting, machine sewing, logo design, vacuum forming, hand tools etc
  • Selection and exploration of briefs

Knowledge acquisition

  • Basic materials taxonomy
  • Manufacturing techniques
  • Problem solving techniques

Year 12, Term 2

NEA progression

  • Research: prove the problem exists, product analysis, target demographic selection, market research, brief development, specialist input, work of a designer, independent research
  • Specification

Knowledge acquisition

  • Design movements
  • Research techniques
  • Marketing

Year 12, Term 3

NEA progression

  • Analysis of task
  • Design development: initial ideas, initial designs, development of form, materials, construction techniques, surface application

Knowledge acquisition

  • Mathematical techniques for design
  • Specialist and smart materials

Year 13, Term 1

NEA progression

  • Final Design
  • Working drawing
  • Flow and Gantt charts
  • Manufacturing

Knowledge acquisition

  • Safe working methods
  • Management systems
  • Quality control and assurance

Year 13, Term 2

NEA progression

  • Complete manufacturing
  • Evaluation

Revision (to follow February half term)

Year 13, Term 3 (one half term only)

Revision

  • Revisiting of topics
  • Class discussion
  • Examination technique and practice questions

Achieving outstanding in Design Technology – knowing and remembering even more than what is expected in a grammar school A level curriculum

Our assessment practice at SHSG reflects on how successful students have been in knowing, remembering and doing more through the above topics.

To go beyond what is expected of a Design Technology student at A Level and achieve outstanding outcomes in the subject, students should engage with their surrounds, ever conscientious, ever critical of the products they are using.  Visiting exhibitions is a fantastic way to broaden cultural capital in design and experience alternative styles and aesthetics to their own, preferred brands.  Students should be courageous in exploring and experimenting with materials and techniques outside of their GCSE experience.

Recommended reading in Design Technology for A level

  • Any books from the KS5 Reading List that are available in the Department

Useful websites, TED Talks and research for A level

  • A list of videos and helpful websites are provided on Teams once you start the course. An up to date list of recommend library books can be found outside the Design Studio.

Music-specific language to master at A level

  • Students will be encouraged to use correct nomenclature for materials and equipment through lessons, written and NEA tasks
  • Students will be encouraged to broaden their descriptive vocabulary in order to access necessarily impressive analyses, developments and evaluations