Curriculum – Drama

Curriculum – Drama

Drama

The Curriculum

Curriculum Intent

Drama at Southend High School for Girls, aims to be an engaging, stimulating, inspiring and challenging course that allows for every student to build the confidence to compete for world leading opportunities in the field of performance and beyond.  Participating in drama will challenge students’ perceptions of the world around them and provide a safe place to express thoughts and feelings that they might not otherwise have a means to express, in turn allowing them to become confident in taking risks and opening the possibility to lead remarkable lives.

In practical terms, drama promotes involvement in, and enjoyment of drama, as performers, directors and designers.  Students explore different forms and styles of performance; engage in methods and processes such as devising techniques, improvisation and textual study; develop presentational and communication skills and acquire technical skills in areas such as lighting and costume design. Additionally, drama provides opportunities to develop skills as informed and thoughtful audience members.

To this end, we want students to have access to creative teaching, expert practitioners and inspiring productions, where students’ innate creativity is fostered and innovation is encouraged.  An enhanced curriculum provides students with further opportunities to participate in a range of production, technical and performance roles or to develop complimentary skills such as playwrighting.

A life enhancing subject.

Skills learnt in drama can serve students well in all aspects of life, from developing a positive and confident self-image, to acquiring self-control and discipline, and taking ethical approaches to their work.  The collaborative nature of drama allows students to learn to work together, to listen to and accept the viewpoints and contributions of others.  Above all, drama allows students to put themselves into others’ shoes and relate to them; it is therefore an important tool for preparing students to live and work in the world with tolerance and empathy. Seeing the world through others’ eyes and really understanding others’ motives and choices is critical in helping to build responsible citizens.

What does it feel like to be a student in the Drama Department?

Studying drama at Southend High School for Girls means engaging in an exciting, inspiring and challenging course where you become the maker of art. You will enjoy and become involved in drama as performer, director and designer. In lessons, you will explore different forms and styles of performance; engage in methods and processes such as improvisation, devising techniques and textual study; develop presentational and communication skills alongside practical skills of voice and movement; acquire technical skills in areas such as lighting and costume design. You will be challenged to work collaboratively, as well as independently, to create original work and to interpret texts from a range of writers, cultures and times.  Each year the department arranges workshops with influential theatre companies such as The Paper Birds and Trestle Theatre, as well as independent practitioners.  You will spend some considerable time watching performances. Through these viewings you will develop a working understanding of contemporary theatre practice, bringing what you see and experience into your own creations. Alongside this, you will develop your ability to analyse how meaning is made in theatre, to become an informed and thoughtful audience member.

As a drama student at SHSG, you will be encouraged to create work that is bold, brave and innovative, in a supportive and creative environment.  You will frequently review and reflect on your work, seeking feedback from audiences.  You will have opportunities to participate in super-curricular performance events in a range of production, technical and performance roles or to develop complimentary skills such as playwrighting or participate in national competitions and LAMDA examinations.  Our students have won prestigious awards for their work with New Views, and Poetry by Heart, and we currently have several students (and past students) who are members of both the National Youth Theatre (NYT) and the National Youth Music Theatre.

In recent years SHSG drama students have progressed to distinguished conservatoires; Trinity Laban, East 15, Rose Bruford, Arts Educational, Urdang Academy.  Others have gone on to study the subject at universities with renowned drama departments: Exeter, Queen Mary’s University of London, King’s College London and Royal Holloway.  However, the value that the study of drama brings to any university course or career is recognised by top universities and employers alike.  Qualities of empathy, discipline, collaboration, and creativity, together with the confidence, presence and communication skills acquired – all combine to provide an advantage for students on any course or career pathway, or simply for navigating life itself.

In conclusion, drama will support you to develop a positive and confident self-image and provide a safe place to express thoughts and feelings that you might not otherwise have a means to express.  Drama will also provide opportunity for you to become more persuasive in your communications – be that through speaking or writing.  Drama allows you to work closely with others.  But perhaps above all, drama will challenge your perceptions of the world around you.  Throughout its long history of thousands of years, drama has always provided a political and social space where makers of drama put themselves into others’ shoes, relating to their stories with empathy and understanding.

Journey

Drama Curriculum

At Southend High School for Girls we teach a curriculum that is ambitious and that aims to be engaging, stimulating, inspiring and where students’ innate creativity can be fostered. This subject allows for every student to build confidence by providing a safe place to express thoughts and feelings that they might not otherwise have a means to express. In drama, students learn to work together, and have opportunity to develop skills to become more persuasive in their communications; be that through speaking or writing. Skills learnt in drama can serve students well in all aspects of life, from developing a positive and confident self-image, to acquiring self-control and discipline, and taking ethical approaches to their work.

The SHSG drama curriculum should expose and challenge students towards gaining access to cultural capital through creative teaching and the introduction to a range of performance styles and inspiring texts and productions.  The curriculum focuses on three main areas – CREATING, PERFORMING (or presenting) RESPONDING.

An enhanced curriculum provides students with further opportunities to participate in a range of production, technical and performance roles.

The drama curriculum is planned and delivered using the intellectual framework of the classical education model, the Trivium:

  • Grammar (Knowledge and skills) knowledge, learning by heart, subject terminology, cultural capital
  • Dialectic (Enquiry and exploration) debate, question, challenge, analyse, evaluate
  • Rhetoric (Communication) essays, speeches, performances, presentations

Year 7 – 9

Pre-requisite or helpful knowledge from Year 6 Drama ready to study in Year 7 if applicable
No pre-requisite is required, students bring with them their unique experiences which they draw upon in Drama.  Some will have prior experience of working with poems, playscripts and role play from primary school, which can provide a foundation for Key Stage 3 study.  Previous access to live performance will be varied and limited or absent altogether for some students.

Adjustments from the Pandemic for years 7 – 9 if applicable?
An awareness that students’ Drama experiences at Primary school will have been affected by the pandemic to an even greater extent than with most other subjects.  Confidence in presenting work of any kind before others may present a real challenge for some and will be managed with care. We will retain in the curriculum the unit on Speaking in Public, introduced during the Covid online teaching to help address this.  Historically we have been able to offer LAMDA Acting or Speaking examinations to disadvantaged students at no cost to them, and we will continue to do this as well as encouraging participation in our enhanced curriculum to these, and AMA, students.

The topics below have been chosen as they reflect the ambitions for Drama as a discrete subject offered by this Grammar school. They have been carefully sequenced to build a student’s learning journey to achieve the aims of our Drama intent. Along the way students are assessed and topics will be revisited in assessments to keep each stage of this learning journey alive.

Year 7

Term 1

Topic 1

  • Introducing Drama precepts and characteristics
  • Physical Theatre performance style

Assessment

  • Creating Drama using body and space
  • Evaluating own and others performance
  • Vocabulary tests

Term 2

Topic 2

  • Speaking in Public – Posture and breath
  • Reciting poetry – Creating and performing

Assessment

  • Speech writing and presenting
  • Poetry recital
  • PUP exam

Term 3

Topic 3

  • Treasure Island – in text and performance
  • The play to stage process
  • Costume

Assessment

  • Performing – Acted scene
  • Responding – Reviewing performance
  • Vocabulary tests

Year 8

Term 1

Topic 1

  • Melodrama – performance style
  • Pantomime – making links between style – Costume design

Assessment

  • Perform a Melodrama sequence
  • Writing scripts in style of Melodrama – Creating and performing
  • PUP exam responding

Term 2

Topic 2

  • Speaking in Public – Articulation and resonance
  • Reciting poetry – Creating and performing
  • Viewing and analysis of performance

Assessment

  • Speech writing and presenting
  • Poetry recital
  • Responding to performance

Term 3

Topic 3

  • The Wardrobe – text
  • Writing own scenes in style of The Wardrobe
  • Set design – Creating and performing

Assessment

  • Performing acted scenes
  • Designing for set and props

Year 9

Term 1

Topic 1

  • Devising Theatre (preparation for GCSE)
  • Verbatim performance styles

Assessment

Creating and performing

  • Devised performance
  • Script writing
  • PUP exam

Term 2

Topic 2

  • Speaking in Public Impromptu speaking
  • Reciting poetry – Creating and performing

Assessment

  • Speech writing and presenting
  • Poetry recital

Term 3

Topic 3

  • Small Island – in text and performance
  • Analysis and evaluation of performance – Responding

Assessment

Creating and performing

  • Performing acted scenes
  • Designing for sound and lighting

Achieving mastery in Drama – knowing and remembering even more than what is expected in a grammar school key stage 3 curriculum

Our assessment practice at SHSG reflects on how successful students have been in knowing, remembering and doing more through the above topics. They are either emerging, developing or proficient in this journey throughout key stage 3.

To go beyond being proficient in what is expected of a Drama student in key stage 3 and achieve mastery in Drama, students should read widely, actively engage between lessons, engage in watching performances and recommended research, and learn key language and subject specific terminology.

Recommended reading in Drama for Lower School (Years 7 – 9)

Books from the KS3 Reading List that are available in the School library as well as the texts  Treasure Island by Bryony Lavery,  Small Island by Helen Edmundson,  The Wardrobe by Sam Holcroft and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night time by Simon Stephens

Useful websites, TED talks and research for Lower School (Years 7 – 9)

Viewing digital productions which students have access to via National Theatre online, including Peter Pan, Treasure Island, and Twelfth Night.

BBC Bitesize Drama

Drama-specific language to master in Lower School (Years 7 – 9)

  • All required terminology is given on the termly Knowledge Audits
  • Students will use specific terminology in each area of the curriculum, and related to CREATING, PERFORMING AND RESPONDING to Drama, as relevant.

At Southend High School for Girls we teach a curriculum that is ambitious and that aims to be engaging, stimulating, inspiring and where students’ innate creativity can be fostered. This subject allows for every student to build confidence by providing a safe place to express thoughts and feelings that they might not otherwise have a means to express. In drama, students learn to work together, and have opportunity to develop skills to become more persuasive in their communications; be that through speaking or writing. Skills learnt in drama can serve students well in all aspects of life, from developing a positive and confident self-image, to acquiring self-control and discipline, and taking ethical approaches to their work.

The SHSG drama curriculum should expose and challenge students towards gaining access to cultural capital through creative teaching and the introduction to a range of performance styles, inspiring texts and productions.

The drama curriculum is planned and delivered using the intellectual framework of the classical education model, the Trivium:

  • Grammar (Knowledge and skills) knowledge, learning by heart, subject terminology, cultural capital
  • Dialectic (Enquiry and exploration) debate, question, challenge, analyse, evaluate
  • Rhetoric (Communication) essays, speeches, performances, presentations

Pre-requisite or helpful knowledge from Key Stage 3 Drama ready to study at GCSE

Some familiarity with performance techniques, stagecraft, design approaches and the beginnings of an appreciation of the cultural capital gained through the study of Drama.

  • Students will be required to demonstrate the ability to use the working methodologies of a theatre practitioner or performance style
  • Use theatrical techniques to create meaning through theatre
  • research and develop ideas
  • interpret texts
  • devise work realising artistic intentions
  • analyse and evaluate the process of creating their own live theatre and the effectiveness of the final outcome as well as interpreting and analysing live theatre performance by others.

Adjustments from the Pandemic for GCSE if applicable?

  • Students have had limited experience of using performance techniques in order to create performance.
  • A lack of an appropriate space
  • Limited opportunity to work in a practical way – collaboratively.
  • For some, the working environment also meant work on texts was not as in depth or focussed as in normal years and some struggled to submit written tasks
  • Therefore, performance work is expected to take longer to develop and may be of a weaker standard.
  • The exam board have made some adjustments to the requirements of examination for this year (2021-22) (see appendix)

The topics below have been chosen as they reflect the ambitions of the National Curriculum, and as a Grammar school, challenge students beyond the National Curriculum. They have been carefully sequenced in order to build a student’s learning journey to achieve the aims of our Drama intent. Along the way students are assessed and topics will be revisited in assessments to keep each stage of this learning journey alive.

Year 10, Term 1

Weeks 1 – 6.  

Theatre Styles

Links to Component 1, 2 and 3

Exploring performance style – Realism and Berkoff, Commedia and Verbatim

  1. Practitioner / style Research
  2. Analysing elements of style
  3. Applying style to acting or design in pairs to duologues (Split Down the Middle).

Ongoing assessment of in class and homework.

Weeks 7 – 13

Introduction to devising from a stimuli –

Links to Component 1 Devising Theatre

  1. research
  2. establish aims
  3. dramatic devices
  4. Structure and characters
  5. set, props, music and sound.

Topic –  GCSE Stimuli  – application of ‘style’ studied.

End of term assessment of Devised work.

Theatre trip – make notes / complete evaluation of live performance

Year 10, Term 2

Weeks 1 – 8

Poetry by Heart competition

Set text study DNA  

1.READ the play, 2. consider THEMES, 3. study CHARACTERS, 4.consider SET AND PROPS, 5. COSTUME, HAIR AND MAKE-UP, 6. LIGHTING AND SOUND

After half term mini scripted performance or design of ‘DNA’
Written evaluation of own work.

Weeks 9 – 12

Component 3 – Interpreting Theatre 10 lessons –

The exam paper –

Weeks 9 – 10    Section A DNA

Weeks 11 – 12 Section B Live theatre performance

Watch second live or digital performance (Jane Eyre or Small Island) consideration of style, acting, interaction, design.

Practice Component 3, Section B, Live theatre visit and evaluation

Year 10, Term 3

Weeks 1 – 12

Reveal exam board published stimuli / begin devised project Component 1

Include relevant practitioner workshops.

Theatre practitioners –  e.g. Frantic Assembly / Berkoff  – including design

Term 2           

Set Text – Component 3 –  DNA approached as Director, designer and actor

Year 11, Term 1

Complete Component 1: Devising Theatre NEA assessed by mid-term (October)

Complete portfolio of supporting evidence by November (part 3 under Controlled conditions)

Choose texts for Component 2: Performing from a text.

Theatre visit and practice Section Bs

Year 11, Term 2

weeks 1- 8 (or to exam date)

Work on and complete Component 2 texts – examination early March

Weeks 8 – 12

Revise DNA

Year 11, Term 3 (one half term only)

6 weeks 1 – 4 (or study leave)

Revise DNA
And practise papers.

Achieving outstanding outcomes in Drama – knowing and remembering even more than what is expected in a grammar school GCSE curriculum

Our assessment practice at SHSG reflects on how successful students have been in knowing, remembering and doing more through the above topics.

To go beyond what is expected of a Drama student at GCSE and achieve outstanding outcomes in Drama, students should engage with practical Drama as much as possible, from watching live Drama in theatres as well as recorded performances online.

Level 8 students: can create work with imagination, flair and artistic creativity, displaying confidence and ease to all audiences. They interpret and perform scripts with a clear understanding of meaning and interpretation. In performance they convey meaning, atmosphere, feeling and tone with skill and precision. Level 8 students use dramatic devices with skill and creativity, applying the appropriate theatrical language. They use a large range of theatrical styles and skills with expert knowledge and understanding. Students are able to meet the needs of the piece effectively and execute a professional performance. In discussion they can accept and delegate responsibility

for the development of the piece, setting tasks for others. Students assess performances with an acute understanding of the requirements.

Recommended reading in Drama for GCSE

  • Any books from the KS4 Reading List that are available in the School library
  • Eduqas GCSE Drama text book
  • DNA by Dennis Kelly

Other texts as chosen during the course.

Useful websites – the National Theatre provide a wealth of videos on a vast range of theatre topics.

Drama-specific language to master at GCSE

  • All required terminology is given in the Eduqas specification glossary

Appendix – Exam board adjustments for 2021-22

Exam board amendments

Summary of Eduqas exam board changes for GCSE Drama 2022 only

Component 1: Devising Theatre

Non-exam assessment 40% of qualification

Learners will be assessed on either acting or design.

Learners participate in the creation, development and performance of a piece of devised theatre using either the techniques of an influential theatre practitioner or a genre, in response to a stimulus set by WJEC.

The minimum time for group performances has been reduced, maximum time unchanged.

Learners can choose to perform a monologue of between 1.5 – 5 minutes in length

Group of two actors: 2-10 minutes

Group of three actors: 3-12 minutes

Group of four actors: 4-14 minutes

Group of five actors: 5-16 minutes.

In line with the reduction in time for performance candidates:

The minimum number of cues expected from lighting and sound candidates has been reduced from 5 to 4.

The minimum requirements for costume design candidates have been reduced from 2 full costumes, hair and make-up for 2 characters to 1 full costume, hair and make-up for 1 character.

Set design cannot be reduced as they are only required to complete one design.

Learners must produce:

  • a realisation of their piece of devised theatre
  • a portfolio of supporting evidence
  • an evaluation of the final performance or design.

Component 2: Performing from a Text

Non-exam assessment* 20% of qualification

Learners will be assessed on either acting or design.

Learners will only be required to study one 10-minute extract (instead of two) from a performance text of their own choice. The performance text chosen must still contrast with the text chosen for Component 3. Learners participate in a performance using a section(s) of text from the chosen extract.

The minimum time for group performances has been reduced

Learners can choose to perform a monologue of between 1.5 – 5 minutes in length

Group of two actors: 2-10 minutes

Group of three actors: 3-12 minutes

Group of four actors: 4-14 minutes

Group of five actors: 5-16 minutes.

In line with the reduction in time for performance candidates

The minimum number of cues expected from lighting and sound candidates has been reduced from 4 to 3.

Costume design and set design cannot be reduced as they are currently only required to complete one design within this component.

SUMMARY OF CHANGES. *We are consulting centres on Assessment Arrangements for GCSE, centre visits in 2022. The consultation closes on 11th July and can be accessed via our secure website.  Assessment Arrangements for 2022 will be confirmed in September 2021.

Component 3: Interpreting Theatre Written examination:

1 hour 30 minutes 40% of qualification

There are no changes within this component. However, centres are reminded that live recordings/streams of productions may be used as live theatre for the Live Theatre Review within Section B.

Section A: Set Text A series of questions on one set DNA, Dennis Kelly.

Section B: Live Theatre Review One question, from a choice of two, requiring analysis and evaluation of a given aspect of a live theatre production seen during the course.

At Southend High School for Girls we teach a curriculum that is ambitious and that aims to be engaging, stimulating, inspiring and where students’ innate creativity can be fostered. This subject allows for every student to build confidence by providing a safe place to express thoughts and feelings that they might not otherwise have a means to express. In drama, students learn to work together, and have opportunity to develop skills to become more persuasive in their communications; be that through speaking or writing. Skills learnt in drama can serve students well in all aspects of life, from developing a positive and confident self-image, to acquiring self-control and discipline, and taking ethical approaches to their work.

The SHSG drama curriculum should expose and challenge students towards gaining access to cultural capital through creative teaching and the introduction to a range of performance styles, inspiring texts and productions.

The drama curriculum is planned and delivered using the intellectual framework of the classical education model, the Trivium:

  • Grammar (Knowledge and skills) knowledge, learning by heart, subject terminology, cultural capital
  • Dialectic (Enquiry and exploration) debate, question, challenge, analyse, evaluate
  • Rhetoric (Communication) essays, speeches, performances, presentations

Pre-requisite or helpful knowledge from Key Stage 4 is useful but not essential.  An interest in theatre is necessary.  

Students can join with the intention to focus on Design for Components 1 and 2.

This course provides a suitable foundation for the study of drama and theatre or a related area through a range of higher education courses, progression to the next level of vocational qualifications or employment.  In addition, the specification provides a coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study for learners who do not progress to further study in this subject.

  • Students will be required to demonstrate the ability to use the working methodologies of two theatre practitioners or theatre companies
  • Use theatrical techniques to create meaning through theatre
  • research and develop ideas
  • interpret texts
  • devise work realising artistic intentions
  • analyse and evaluate the process of creating their own live theatre and the effectiveness of the final outcome as well as interpreting and analysing live theatre performance by others.

Adjustments from the Pandemic for A level if applicable?

  • Students had extremely limited opportunity to develop work practically – be that exploring use of space or performance techniques.
  • They have had limited experience of using performance techniques in order to create performance.
  • For some, the working environment also meant work on texts was not as in depth or focussed as in normal years and some struggled to submit written reports by deadlines or at all.
  • Therefore, performance work is expected to take longer to develop and may be of a weaker standard.

The topics below have been chosen to both reflect the ambitions for Drama by this Grammar school and the Eduqas examination board specification for Drama and Theatre A level. They have been carefully sequenced to meet the assessment objectives for the examination board. The A level specification is synoptic, and students are encouraged to apply their learning as directors, designers and actors, to a range of new and challenging scenarios.  Along the way students are assessed to monitor progress, knowledge and understanding in the achievement objectives:

AO1 Create and develop ideas to communicate meaning as part of the theatre making process, making connections between dramatic theory and practice

AO2 Apply theatrical skills to realise artistic intentions in live performance

AO3 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how drama and theatre is developed and performed

AO4 Analyse and evaluate their own work and the work of others.

Our assessment practice at SHSG reflects on how successful students have been in knowing, remembering and doing more through the above topics, as gauged by comparison with the examination board assessment objective marking criteria. 

Students are encouraged to engage with live performance and developments in the world of professional theatre practice.  A significant aspect of success is determined by their ability to incorporate contemporary theatre practices into their own work where appropriate.

Recommended reading for Drama and Theatre

Boal, A. (1976). Theatre of the Oppressed. Pluto Press: London Bolton, G. (1984).

Antonin Artaud – the Theatre and its Double

Stanislavski – My life in Art

Stanislavski – Building a Character

Actions – the Actors Thesaurus

The Actor and the Target –  Declan Donnellan

The Director’s craft  – Katie Mitchell

Learning through Theatre, Routledge: London. Neelands, J. and Goode T. (2000)

Structuring Drama Work 2nd Edition CUP; Cambridge Neelands, J. (2004)

The Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies, Cambridge; Cambridge University Press Braun, E. (1982)

The Director and the Stage Methuen; London Brecht, B. (1948)

The Empty Space – Peter Brook.   Penguin; Harmondsworth Carlson, M. (1996)

Signs of Performance Routledge DOLAN, J. (2005).

The Field of Drama London; Methuen Freshwater, H. (2009)

Theatre & audience, London: Palgrave MacMillan Leach, R. (2013)

Theatre Studies: the basics, Routledge: London. Kershaw, B. (1992)

The Politics of Performance Routledge; London Neelands, J & Dobson, W. (2000)

Drama and Theatre Studies at AS and A Level Hodder & Stoughton London Neelands, j. & Dobson. W. (2000)

Performance Studies: An introduction, 3rd edition, Routledge, New York. Role of Story (full-time students only) Alfreds, M. (2013)

Then What Happens? Storytelling and Adapting for Theatre, Nick Hern Books: London. Bettelheim, B. (1976)

The Uses of Enchantment, Penguin. Brecht, B. (1968)

The Virago Book of Fairy Tales, Virago. Cassady, M. (1990)

Storytelling Step by Step, Resource Tatar, M. (ed.)(1999)

The Frantic Assembly book of Devising

The Moving Body – Jacques Lecoq

Any videos on the National Theatre Education site.

Terminology is provided in the Eduqas Specification documents.

Year 12, Term 1

Viewing of live theatre as and when appropriate.

If live theatre is not available, visit to cinema screenings or in house viewings of live theatre e.g. NT Live

Induction Programme:

  • Improvisation as a creative tool Introduction of elements of Drama & Theatre:
  • Elements of characterisation
  • Acting techniques
  • Shakespeare Monologue exercise

Improvisation
EXPOSITION
COMPLICATION
CLIMAX
DENOUEMENT

Understand the rules of making offers, accepting and extending.  Not blocking, not wimping, not stealing.

Environments

Discuss the importance of portfolio writing and recording as rehearsal strategies will be valuable to refer to throughout the course.

BASELINE TEST:

Students given descriptions of practitioners Brecht, Stanislavski and Artaud.

Warm up activities

Discuss differences between naturalistic and non-naturalistic styles.

Task 1 Using Hansel and Gretel – perform in the style of one of these practitioners

Task 2 Evaluate their own work and analysis of another group’s work.

Topic 1:  Practitioner Workshops:

  • The Paper Birds

Mini Devising project

Topic 2: Introduction of: Set Text ONE for Component 3.

Hedda Gabler
Focus on narrative, themes, OPC.

Stanislavski: approaches to text; system of rehearsal; naturalism

Year 12, Term 2

Viewing of live theatre as and when appropriate.

Topic 1:   Poetry by Heart  (dates to be aligned with SHSG competition)

Work on recitations and techniques, and provide feedback

Topic 2: Introduce Set text Love and Information.  From perspective of Director, designer and actor

Year 12, Term 3

Topic 3:  Component 1: Theatre Workshop

  • Choose text for deconstruction
  • Choose 15 minute extract
  • Choose practitioner
  • Start the practical work
  • Focus on Creative Log

Revision of Hedda Gabler/Love and Information in preparation for PPEs.

PPE Exams

Students to re-read set texts over Summer break
Hedda Gabler and Love and Information
Practice papers
Complete first draft of Section 1 and 2 of the Creative Log for  Component 1, re-imagined text

Year 13, Term 1

Week of 20th September are the Year 13 EBs, when they will sit exams under exam conditions during lesson time.

1 exam will be a practice run of Component 1

Viewings of Live Theatre

Continue to rehearse component 1

Complete creative logs

Component 1, Theatre Workshop Re-imagined text, and creative logs

November  NEA assessment

Component 2

Choose Eduqas-set stimulus for devised /text work for Component 2.

  1. Choose TEXT for Component 2 and stylistic approach.

Conduct research for style choice.

  1. Choose a topic for DEVISED performance for Component 2 based on the chosen stimulus

Choose practitioner approach for Component 2 devised performance

Conduct research for practitioner choice.

Revision of Hedda Gabler/Love and Information.

Year 13, Term 2

Viewings of live theatre as and when appropriate.

Continue to research and rehearse TEXT for Component 2 using a stylistic approach.

Continue to research and rehearse DEVISED performance for Component 2 based on the chosen stimulus

Write Process Reports for Component 2

Assessment to a visiting examiner

Weeks of: 1 March 2022.  And  28th March 2022

Revision

PPE Exams

Curious Incident extract released in March – work on this over holiday

Consider two approaches / two stages (Pros Arch – Brecht/In the round – Physical Theatre)

Focus on ground plans and cue sheets, design and movement approaches

Year 13, Term 3

Practice for Component 3 exam

Component 3 examination

Hedda week 1/2

Love and Information week 3/4