Curriculum – History

Curriculum – History

History

The Curriculum

Curriculum Intent

History at Southend High School for Girls gives students a sense of chronology that enables them to understand the process of change, including causation, consequence, turning points and significance, in order that they can make sense of the present. Our students will understand the story of Britain, the people who make up modern Britain, and the wider world, and to have an appreciation of the past in all its diversity, including women, people of colour, and those not in positions of power. They will know how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world. They will develop a wide chronological vision, studying the world from ancient civilisations through to the closing decades of the 20th century. This will encompass periods as broad as the Saxons, Medieval monarchy, Early Modern Britain, the making of modern Ghana, WW1, the Cold War and the fight for Civil Rights, and Empires as diverse as the Roman Empire, the British Empire, the Soviet Empire and Third Reich.  Students will have a mastery of the facts in order to independently formulate arguments that are clearly expressed, coherently organised and effectively supported. They will have the skills and confidence to analyse and evaluate the evidence from contemporary sources and the interpretations of historians by applying their own detailed knowledge and understanding. They will understand that the past is constructed and contested through research, analysis of evidence, and the formulation of new questions.

What does it feel like to be a student in the History Department?

Studying History at SHSG is an experience that is challenging and intellectually stimulating, and expectations of you will be high. You will be expected to be intellectually curious and self motivated. You will be taught to express your ideas articulately using appropriate vocabulary, whilst supporting your points with detailed and precise knowledge. You will be asked to analyse and evaluate primary sources and historians’ interpretations in light of your own contextual knowledge. You will be expected to come to your lessons having prepared for them in advance by reading or consolidating your prior knowledge. You will be taught to write coherent paragraphs and then to develop this into extended and sophisticated formal writing. You will be given opportunities to extend your learning by visiting sites of historical significance, such as Mountfitchet castle, the WW1 battlefields, Berlin, Russia and Poland. By the end of your History studies you will have acquired the ability to balance an argument, to support your point of view with accurate evidence, and a wide knowledge of the past in all its diversity of sex, class and colour.

Journey

History Curriculum

At Southend High School for Girls we teach a curriculum that is ambitious and takes students on a learning journey beyond the National Curriculum for History. The SHSG History curriculum is what we believe will expose and challenge students to a cultural capital in History that is the best that has been thought and said in this subject.

The History curriculum is planned and delivered using the intellectual framework of the classical education model, the Trivium:

  • Grammar (Knowledge and skills) knowledge, learning by heart, subject terminology
  • Dialectic (Enquiry and exploration) analyse, evaluate
  • Rhetoric (Communication) PLEE paragraphs, essays, debating

Year 7 – 9

Pre-requisite or helpful knowledge from Year 6 History ready to study in Year 7 if applicable

  • N/A

Adjustments from the Pandemic for years 7 – 9 if applicable?

  • Extra focus is being put on the construction of PLEE paragraphs, which are the basic building blocks of extended writing.
  • Key concepts are repeated and understanding checked regularly.

The topics below have been chosen as they reflect the ambitions of the National Curriculum, and as a Grammar school, also challenge students beyond the National Curriculum. They have been carefully sequenced in this order to build a student’s learning journey to achieve the aims of our History intent. Along the way students are assessed and topics will be revisited in assessments to keep each stage of this learning journey alive.

Year 7: the Ancient World and the Middle Ages

Term 1

  • The Body in the Bog
  • The Roman Empire
  • The Vikings and Saxons
  • The Norman Conquest and consolidation of power

Assessment

  • Two PLEE paragraphs
  • One knowledge-based summative assessment at the end of term

Term 2

  • Medieval Monarchs (Matilda, Henry, Eleanor of Aquitaine, John)
  • Medieval religion
  • Medieval Kingship (Richard and John)

Assessment

  • Two PLEE paragraphs
  • One knowledge-based summative assessment at the end of term

Term 3

  • Black Death and its impact
  • The Peasants’ Revolt
  • The Mughal Empire
  • Tokugawain Japan

Assessment

  • One PLEE paragraph
  • One knowledge-based summative assessment
  • PUP

Year 8: the Early Modern World

Term 1

  • Henry VIII and the Reformation
  • Tudorship Kingship & Queenship
  • James, Witchcraft and the Gunpowder Plot

Assessment

  • One PLEE paragraph
  • One ‘two opposing PLEE paragraphs + conclusion’ essay
  • One knowledge-based summative assessment at the end of term

Term 2

  • Charles I and the Civil War
  • Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries

Assessment

  • One PLEE paragraph
  • One ‘two opposing PLEE paragraphs + conclusion’ essay
  • One knowledge-based summative assessment at the end of term

Term 3

  • Africa before the Slave Trade
  • Colonisation and the Slave Trade
  • The making of modern Ghana

Assessment

  • One PLEE paragraph
  • One knowledge-based summative assessment
  • PUP

Year 9: the Modern World

Term 1

  • Causes of WW1
  • Events of WW1
  • The Russian Revolution

Assessment

  • One PLEE paragraph
  • One HFDYA essay
  • One knowledge-based summative assessment at the end of term

Term 2

  • Treaty of Versailles
  • Weimar, Nazis
  • Appeasement
  • WW2

Assessment

  • One PLEE paragraph
  • One HFDYA essay
  • One knowledge-based summative assessment at the end of term

Term 3

  • Holocaust
  • Mao’s China
  • Civil rights in the USA

Assessment

  • One PLEE paragraph
  • One knowledge-based summative assessment
  • One PUP

Achieving mastery in History – knowing and remembering even more than what is expected in a grammar school Year 7 curriculum

Our assessment practice at SHSG reflects on how successful students have been in knowing, remembering and doing more through the above topics. They are either emerging, developing or proficient in this journey throughout Year 7.

To go beyond being proficient in what is expected of a History student in Year 7 and achieve mastery in History, students should read widely (including non-fiction work), build up their body of factual knowledge, and learn key language and subject specific terminology.

Recommended reading in English for Lower School (Years 7 – 9)

  • Any age-appropriate historical fiction
  • Any formal, non-fiction writing, especially opinion pieces in news media

Useful websites, TED Talks and research for Lower School (Years 7 – 9)

  • History – BBC Bitesize
  • ‘You’re Dead To Me’ podcast

History-specific language to master in Lower School (Years 7 – 9)

  • Key vocabulary is highlighted during lessons and on PPTs
  • Language of dialectic: analyse / evaluate

Pre-requisite or helpful knowledge from Year KS3 History ready to study in Year 10

  • PLEE paragraphs and HFDYA essay structure
  • Further details can be found in the KS3 curriculum map

Adjustments from the Pandemic for years 10-11 if applicable?

  • Extra focus is being put on the construction of PLEE paragraphs, which are the basic building blocks of extended writing.
  • Key concepts are repeated and understanding checked regularly.

Year 10

Term 1

Superpower Relations

  • How and why did the Cold War develop 1941-58
  • Why did tensions between the Superpowers escalate significantly 1958-70?

Assessment

  • Summative assessment 1 (Superpower relations narrative account & importance of)
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Term 2

Superpower Relations

  • Why did tensions between the Superpowers escalate significantly 1958-70?

Richard and John

  • In what ways, and how successfully, did Richard and John govern England 1189-1216?
  • For what reasons, and how successfully, did Richard and John campaign overseas?

Assessment

  • Summative assessment (Superpower relations end of unit test)
  • Summative assessment (R&J explain why)
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Term 3

Richard and John

  • To what extent, and for what reasons, did John’s reign end in failure

Weimar and Nazi Germany

  • How successful was the Weimar Republic 1918-29?

Assessment

  • PPE (Superpower relations and Richard & John full paper)
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Year 11

Term 1

Weimar and Nazi Germany

  • Why was Hitler able to rise to power 1919-33?
  • How, and how successfully, did the Nazis gain control of Germany 1933-9?

Assessment

  • Summary assessment 1 (Weimar Germany)
  • PPE 1 (Superpower Relations and Richard & John)
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Term 2

Weimar and Nazi Germany

  • What was the Nazi regime for the German people?

Crime and punishment

  • Crime, punishment and law enforcement in Anglo-Saxon England
  • Crime, punishment and law enforcement in the later Middle Ages
  • Crime, punishment and law enforcement in the 18th and 19th century
  • Crime, punishment and law enforcement in recent times

Assessment

  • PPE 2 (Germany)
  • Summative assessment (C&P)
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Term 3

Crime and punishment

  • Whitechapel
  • Revision

Assessment

  • GCSE exams
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Achieving outstanding outcomes in History – knowing and remembering even more than what is expected in a grammar school Year 10 and 11 curriculum

To achieve to the highest level at GCSE History, students will need to:

  • demonstrate relevant and comprehensive knowledge, using first order concepts, combined with a sophisticated understanding of key features and characteristics.
  • Construct a convincing line of reasoning in relation to relevant second order concepts and reach reasoned, and substantiated judgements.
  • Critically analyse and evaluate, to reach reasoned, and substantiated judgements of:
    • A range of sources, in context, to investigate historical issues
    • Interpretations and why they may differ.

Recommended reading in History for Middle School (Years 10 – 11)

  • Any age-appropriate historical fiction
  • Any formal, non-fiction writing, especially opinion pieces in news media

Useful websites, TED Talks and research for Lower School (Years 10 – 11)

  • History – BBC Bitesize
  • BBC History website
  • ‘You’re Dead To Me’ podcast

History-specific language to master in Middle School (Years 10 – 11)

  • Key vocabulary is highlighted during lessons and on PPTs
  • Language of dialectic: analyse / evaluate

Pre-requisite or helpful knowledge from Year KS4 History ready to study in Year 12

  • N/A

Adjustments from the Pandemic for years 12-13 if applicable?

  • Extra focus is being put on revision techniques and exam practise, in particular working in exam conditions
  • Year 13 coursework topics have been adjusted to act as consolidation of work done during lockdown in Year 12

Year 12

Term 1

The Early Tudors

  • Edward and Mary

France in Revolution

  • Causes and course of the Revolution

Assessment

  • Summative assessment (causes of the French Revolution)
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Term 2

The Early Tudors

  • Elizabeth

France in Revolution

  • Rise and rule of Napoleon

Assessment

  • Summative assessment (Edward and Mary end of unit test)
  • Summative assessment (French Revolution to 1795)
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Term 3

The Early Tudors

  • Elizabeth

France in Revolution

  • Revision

Coursework

  • Mock coursework

Assessment

  • PPE
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Year 13

Term 1

Russia and its Rulers

  • Nationalities
  • Government

Coursework

  • Research

Assessment

  • Mock coursework
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Term 2

Russia and its rulers

  • Economics
  • War and Revolution

Coursework

  • Draft 1

Assessment

  • PPE on Russia
  • In-class PPE (one on French Revolution, one on Tudors)
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Term 3

  • Revision

Assessment

  • A level exams
  • See assessment policy for formative assessments

Achieving outstanding outcomes in History – knowing and remembering even more than what is expected in a grammar school A level curriculum

To achieve to the highest level at A level History, students will be able to:

  • recall, select and deploy accurate, relevant and precise historical knowledge appropriately with arguments that are well organised and communicated with clarity
  • show understanding through analysis and explanation and reach substantiated and mostly sustained judgements about key concepts
  • show understanding through analysis and explanation and reach substantiated and mostly sustained judgements about the relationships between key features/characteristics of the historical period
  • analyse and evaluate source material in its historical context with insight and discrimination
  • analyse and evaluate how, in relation to the historical context, aspects of the past have been interpreted in different ways. Use interpretations appropriately to substantiate arguments.

Recommended reading in History for Sixth Form (Years 12-13)

  • See the KS5 History reading list

Useful websites, TED Talks and research for Sixth Form (Years 12-13)

  • Podcast: In Our Time
  • BBC History website

History-specific language to master in Sixth Form (Years 12-13)

  • Key words are highlighted during lessons and as appropriate written down and defined by students.
  • Language of dialectic: analyse / evaluate
  • Evaluative language is modelled and taught